Bill of Rights the Unapologetic American Version

Bill of Rights the Unapologetic American Version

Bill of Rights the Unapologetic American Version

 Bill of Rights the Unapologetic American Version

The Bill of Rights is the collective name for the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution. These limitations serve to protect the natural rights of liberty and property. They guarantee a number of personal freedoms, limit the government’s power in judicial and other proceedings, and reserve some powers to the states and the public.

 Bill of Rights the Unapologetic American Version

Bill of Rights the Unapologetic American Version

For those out there in America who like to burn flags, spit on our Veterans and preach your basic hate and discontent, the collective we, the soldiers, sailors, marines, coasties, air men and guard are the same group of women and men that signed their names and took a oath just SO YOU COULD HAVE THE RIGHT TO TREAT US AND AMERICA LIKE SHITE! By your sheepdogs at www.unapologeticallyamerican.com  this ain’t Nam dude brought to you by your sheepdawgs at firebase116.org

Please support and wear the Ranger Up line of clothes for women and men.  See them, order them, FEEL THEM at www.rangerup.com watcha waiting for? RTFU and get moving soldier!

 Bill of Rights the Unapologetic American Version

Bill of Rights the Unapologetic American Version

America’s Prisoner of War/Missing/Killed in Action – WE WILL NEVER FORGET!

Friday, September 21, 2012 is the National POW/MIA Recognition Day. 

Observances of National POW/MIA Recognition Day are held across the country on military installations, ships at sea, state capitols, schools and veterans’ facilities. It is traditionally observed on the third Friday in September each year. This observance is one of six days throughout the year that Congress has mandated the flying of the National League of Families’ POW/MIA flag. The others are Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day and Veterans Day.

The flag is to be flown at major military installations, national cemeteries, all post offices, VA medical facilities, the World War II Memorial, Korean War Veterans Memorial, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the official offices of the secretaries of state, defense and veterans affairs, the director of the selective service system and the White House.

WE WILL NOT FORGET THAT, ALL GAVE SOME AND SOME GAVE ALL!

Sept. 21, 2012 POW/MIA National Recognition Day

Sept. 21, 2012 POW/MIA National Recognition Day

firebase116.org WILL NEVER FORGET the women and men POW/MIA/KIAs.  Our American Flag is flying right above our National League of Families’ POW/MIA flag today and EVERY DAY.

MISSING FROM VIETNAM WAR IDENTIFIED

WELCOME HOME – Joseph Christiano, Derrell B. Jeffords, Dennis L. Eilers, William K. Colwell, Arden K. Hassenger, Larry C. Thornton.

MISSING FROM VIETNAM WAR IDENTIFIED

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of six U.S. servicemen, missing in action from the Vietnam War, were recently identified and are being returned to their families for burial with full military honors.

Air Force Col. Joseph Christiano, 43, of Rochester, N.Y.; Col. Derrell B. Jeffords, 40, of Florence, S.C.; Lt. Col. Dennis L. Eilers, 27, Cedar Rapids, Iowa; Chief Master Sgt. William K. Colwell, 44, Glen Cove, N.Y.; Chief Master Sgt. Arden K. Hassenger, 32, of Lebanon, Ore.; and Chief Master Sgt. Larry C. Thornton, 33, Idaho Falls, Idaho, will be buried as a group July 9, in a single casket representing the entire crew, in Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, D.C.

REST IN PEACE BROTHERS.

On Dec. 24, 1965, the crew was aboard an AC-47D aircraft nicknamed “Spooky” that failed to return from a combat strike mission in southern Laos. After a “mayday” signal was sent, all contact was lost with the crew. Following the crash, two days of search efforts for the aircraft and crew were unsuccessful.

In 1995, a joint U.S./Lao People’s Democratic Republic (L.P.D.R.) team investigated a crash in Savannakhet Province, Laos. Local villagers recalled seeing a two-propeller aircraft, similar to an AC-47D, crash in December 1965. A local man found aircraft wreckage in a nearby field while farming, and led the team to that location. The team recovered small pieces of aircraft wreckage at that time and recommended further investigative visits.

Joint U.S./L.P.D.R. investigation and recovery teams re-visited the site four times from 1999 to 2001. They conducted additional interviews with locals, recovered military equipment, and began an excavation. No human remains were recovered, so the excavation was suspended pending additional investigation.

In 2010, joint U.S./L.P.D.R. recovery teams again excavated the crash site. The team recovered human remains, personal items, and military equipment. Three additional excavations in 2011 recovered additional human remains and evidence. Scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command used dental records and circumstantial evidence in the identification of their remains.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call (703) 699-1420.

 

National POW/MIA Recognition Day

The President issues a proclamation commemorating the observances and reminding the nation of those Americans who have sacrificed so much for their country.

Observances of National POW/MIA Recognition Day are held across the country on military installations, ships at sea, state capitols, schools and veterans’ facilities. It is traditionally observed on the third Friday in September each year. This observance is one of six days throughout the year that Congress has mandated the flying of the National League of Families’ POW/MIA flag. The others are Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day and Veterans Day.

The flag is to be flown at major military installations, national cemeteries, all post offices, VA medical facilities, the World War II Memorial, Korean War Veterans Memorial, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the official offices of the secretaries of state, defense and veterans affairs, the director of the selective service system and the White House.

A Pentagon ceremony for National POW/MIA Recognition Day was held on Friday, Sept.16, 2011. This ceremony featured troops from each of the military services.

National POW/MIA Recognition Day  –  9.12.2012

POW/MIA Posters for Prior Years:

NOTE: Right click any graphic and choose “Save File” to download the poster. Left click to go to the Prior Year Webpage.

Recognition Day Supporting Information

From Our Commander and Chief – Memorial Day 2012

President Barack Obama’s testimonial to the contributions and sacrifices of Vietnam War veterans was long overdue, and Americans should heed the commander in chief’s words in trying to right a terrible wrong.
Sentinel & Enterprise
Posted: 06/03/2012 06:32:49 AM EDT

At a Memorial Day ceremony held at the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, D.C., Obama urged Americans to mark the 50th anniversary of that ill-fated war by praising the soldiers who served and assisting them with issues they might be facing.

Five decades ago, tens of thousands of soldiers returned from Vietnam to an unwelcome homecoming, physically and psychologically battered from a long, torturous war that resulted in 58,000 American deaths and the perception of a military “defeat.” Soldiers were unjustly blamed for the war’s misguided management by White House politicians who meddled in military strategy and prolonged America’s involvement in a misunderstood foreign battle. Many brave men and women died needlessly; others continue to bear the wounds of combat and the mental scars of fighting a war that grew so unpopular it forced a sitting president, Lyndon Baines Johnson, to decide not to seek re-election.

Unfortunately, the soldiers got stuck with the black stain on America’s image rather than the politicians who deserved it. President Obama said it is time to wipe the slate clean.

“You were sometimes blamed for the misdeeds of a few,” Obama told Vietnam veterans. “You came home and were sometimes denigrated when you should have been celebrated. It was a national shame, a disgrace that should have never happened.

“Even though some Americans turned their backs on you, you never turned your backs on America,” said the president.

A majority of Vietnam veterans readjusted to civilian life, went to school, got good jobs, became successful business owners, productive workers and solid citizens and raised families. They put the worst behind them with dignity, despite the cloud that was hung over their heads for years. Obama wants America to show its gratitude to these sons and daughters of liberty once and for all. We agree wholeheartedly.

The president has designated May 28 to Nov. 11 for commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War. We urge each community to do its part with programs, ceremonies and activities that honor the veterans who did what they were asked to do, without complaint, in that long-ago and much-maligned conflict.