Reading Of The Names – Vietnam Veteran Memorial 2012


Reading Of The Names – Vietnam Veteran Memorial 2012

From November 7 to November 10, 2012, the “Reading Of The Names” will take place at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC.  I will have the honor and privilege to read 30 names on November 9th.  I will be reading the following names from Panel  37  W :

1. FIAPAI FANUA JR
2. EDDIE D FOSTER
3. FRED GERTZEN
4. MICHAEL E GIBIS
5. RICKY D GIPSON
6. NICHOLAS V GONZALES
7. DANIEL L GREGG
8. VICTOR HALE
9. CHARLES W HALL JR
10. WAYNE D HAMILTON
11. JOHN D HANCOCK
12. JOHN C HARDING JR
13. MARVIN L HARTMAN
14. JOHN F HIGGINS
15. DAVID M JALBERT
16. RICHARD D JAMES
17. JOHN K KOSTER
18. CONNARD D MALLORY
19. LARRY L MARSH
20. LEROY C MARTINSON
21. CARL J MILLER
22. DAVID N MOORE
23. FRANK F MUSICK
24. STEPHEN E NEAS
25. JERRY L OWENS
26. JOSEPH S PIRRUCCELLO JR
27. ROBERT A REX
28. EARNEST L REYNOLDS
29. FELIX D RIDGE
30. LARRY G SANDNES

I have read up about every one of these men.  Every one of them is a hero.  These names represent only 30 out of the 58,282 men and women who “Gave It All” so others could be free.  These are 30 of the bravest men who ever existed.  Some of them were killed so their “Brothers” could live.  Some were killed by “friendly fire”.  Some are still listed as MIA.  These men were men of honor, courage, loyalty, integrity, spirit, respect, dedication, and patriotism.  These men set the standard for others to aspire to obtain.  None of these men died in vain.  They died trying to preserve freedom in a land where there was none.

I salute these men, they are all my Heroes.  I will NEVER forget them.

To the members of firebase116.org, Chapter 116, Leominster, MA:

I would be honored to remember any men or women that you would like.  I can do etchings of a Heroes name, or leave a message, flowers, a prayer or something for them to let them know that you will NEVER forget them.  I’ll be at The Wall for 4 days.  Let me know if there is anything I can do for you.  Email me your requests: jbarry@firebase116.org.

Viewpoint: Stand Down Stands Up For Our Veterans

Viewpoint: Stand Down Stands Up For Our Veterans                                                                                  By JAMES SENEY

With his muscular build and short hair, he is perhaps one of the last people anyone would expect to be homeless.

But in the next month, the 22-year-old veteran may lose his apartment and join the ranks of New England’s homeless people.

And he is not alone. One year ago, the former Army private first class was a proud member of Operation Enduring Freedom, completing a one-year deployment in Afghanistan.

Now he wonders if he’ll get a job or, one year from now, where he will live.

Next week in Springfield, the Western Massachusetts Stand Down will be held to help as many of the estimated 3,000 homeless veterans in our region and to prevent veterans believed to be at risk of homelessness from being without a place to live.

The event, held at the Greek Cultural Center in the North End, represents a close partnership with many organizations, including strong leadership from Gumersindo Gomez from the Western Mass Bilingual Veterans Outreach Center, the city of Springfield, the Massachusetts Department of Veterans’ Services, and our area’s municipal veteran services officers.

The 2012 Stand Down will take place Friday, Sept. 28, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. It provides veterans with a centralized, one-stop approach to receiving resources on the spot, bringing together VA programs and services; community health care providers, including health prevention and wellness resources; counseling services; legal aid; the Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles; the Social Security Administration; and many other services, including food, clothing and haircuts.

According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, the current economic downturn and the downsizing of the armed forces are the biggest risk factors for newly demobilized service members, resulting in postwar unemployment, missed rent payments and homelessness. Many, like the 22 year-old former soldier, sleep in their cars, move in for a while with relatives or friends, camp out in the woods, or find a cheap motel room and never come to the attention of state or local authorities. And the new picture of veteran homelessness also includes female veterans with children. Nearly all are unemployed. They want to work but cannot find jobs or at least steady work. Or they have work but cannot find housing they can afford so they end up couch surfing – the practice of temporarily living with a stranger – free of charge.

Most never dreamed they would find themselves in such straits. And their troubles are just starting as fall begins and cold weather will quickly set in. Stand Down, while focused on those veterans at greatest risk of needing services, is also intended for all veterans, including active-duty military members, and their families.

With a tough economy and our nation still in recession, every veteran can benefit from the information and resources shared at Stand Down. Three-and-a-half years ago, an estimated 107,000 veterans were homeless in our nation. The number is now estimated to be less than 60,000 but the VA and our community partners cannot be satisfied until every Veteran who has fought for America has a home in America.

If we are to end the travesty of veteran homelessness, we need a total team approach. Every citizen has a role to play. At a minimum, we’d ask for your help in identifying and referring veterans in need. Every community member can make a difference in reaching out to our veterans. The hardship of homelessness is compounded by the truth that our homeless veterans had once put their lives on the line to serve our country in wars past and present. They deserve the very best support network possible. When we ask our men and women to fight and sacrifice for us in defense of our nation, we make a promise that we will give them the support they need when they come home. The Stand Down offers one way to fulfill that promise. If you know a veteran in need, tell them about Stand Down.


James Seney is the program manager for Community Reintegration Services for the VA Central Western Massachusetts Healthcare System.

Click here for more info concerning upcoming Stand Downs.

America’s Prisoner of War/Missing/Killed in Action – WE WILL NEVER FORGET!

Friday, September 21, 2012 is the National POW/MIA Recognition Day. 

Observances of National POW/MIA Recognition Day are held across the country on military installations, ships at sea, state capitols, schools and veterans’ facilities. It is traditionally observed on the third Friday in September each year. This observance is one of six days throughout the year that Congress has mandated the flying of the National League of Families’ POW/MIA flag. The others are Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day and Veterans Day.

The flag is to be flown at major military installations, national cemeteries, all post offices, VA medical facilities, the World War II Memorial, Korean War Veterans Memorial, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the official offices of the secretaries of state, defense and veterans affairs, the director of the selective service system and the White House.

WE WILL NOT FORGET THAT, ALL GAVE SOME AND SOME GAVE ALL!

Sept. 21, 2012 POW/MIA National Recognition Day

Sept. 21, 2012 POW/MIA National Recognition Day

firebase116.org WILL NEVER FORGET the women and men POW/MIA/KIAs.  Our American Flag is flying right above our National League of Families’ POW/MIA flag today and EVERY DAY.

Homeless and Hungry Veterans in America

The #1 problem that I just cannot wrap my head around and understand is homeless and hungry Veterans in America.  I can’t figure it out.  I just do not understand the whys or the hows about it.  Women and men that fought for our great country are sleeping on the streets, in cardboard shacks and in abandoned cars, AND they are hungry.  Days and weeks go by and these GREAT AMERICAN HEROES are without a hot meal, clean clothes and a shower.  People walk past them on the streets and mutter, “Get a job…”  God knows that these women and men would work if they could only find a job.  Problem is that there’s just no work for anyone.  And too few Americans care about what is happening to our Heroes.  Nothing can make me understand this phenomenon. 

Women Veterans are three time more likely to be at risk of homelessness than non-veteran women.

WHAT?  How can that be?  WHY is this happening?  HOW can this happen?  IS this the way America wants her Veterans to be treated?  What can we do to change this in America?  America is the greatest nation in the World.  America is rich beyond belief, but we have homeless and hungry VETERANS.

I ask each and every one that reads this post to change the statistics and how America treats her Heroes.  I’ll post a bunch of links where YOU can make a difference.  And it’s not all about money either.  Volunteering and giving some of yourself to put an end to hunger and homelessness.  When you don’t have a dollar in your own pocket, you can still give a smile.  Don’t look down on our Street Vets.  A little understanding and a smile goes a LONG way.  If your of the type that prays and believes in a Power Greater than yourself…say a prayer asking Her or Him to help them AND you overcome this problem.  Bring a bag of apples or oranges to a homeless shelter.  Think.  This is our problem, they are our Sisters and Brothers.  Love, compassion, understanding and support are what our Heroes need.  They need a hand up and not a hand out.  Respect.  Dignity.  These are honorable men and women.

I know first hand what it’s like to be without a job and without a home.  I survived the streets of Boston.  I’ve been hungry and alone out there.  I don’t want to go back there.  Most importantly, I do not want my Brothers or Sisters to go through what I went through.

As promised, here are the links for you to consider.  Do what you can, whatever that may be to help.  Thank you.  – J. Barry

Business and Professional Woman’s Foundation – Connect a Vet Resources

Make the Connection – Homelessness – Veterans

Help a Homeless Veteran – VA.gov

For Homeless Women Veterans – VA.gov

The Veterans Site – Feed a Veteran  <– This site will cost you 1 click!

New England Center for Homeless VeteransA Hand UP!  Not a Hand out!

Volunteers of America – Veterans Services

Project Foot – A Charity For Homeless Veterans and Military Families

The Veteran Homestead Inc.

The Jericho Project – Off the Streets – On With Life

Feed Our Vets – Food Pantry

The above links are just a sample of some wonderful ways for you to SUPPORT AND HELP  AMERICA’S HEROES.

 

FEED OUR VETS!

FEED OUR VETSEVERY DAY NEARLY 1000 SOLDIERS, SAILORS AND MARINES BECOME NEW U.S. VETERANS.  1.5 MILLION VETERANS ARE AT RISK OF BECOMING HOMELESS AND BEING HUNGRY.  130,000 VETERANS ARE HOMELESS AND HUNGRY ON ANY GIVEN NIGHT.

The Mission of the Feed Our Vets non-profit food pantry organization is to provide good, nutritious food for Veterans in the United States whose circumstances have left them on the battlefield of hunger.

The Objective of Feed Our Vets non-profit food pantry organization is to have fully stocked veteran food pantries set up in accessible locations all across the country. We support those who have fought for us, by providing food for veterans.

DONATE!

Donate to Feed Our Vets

We need your support because our nation’s military Veterans have served and sacrificed for our freedom. We believe it is our duty to give back to these men and women who have given so much for our country. 100% of your online donation for veterans helps feed hungry and homeless veterans. Too many Veterans are ending up jobless and homeless. Too many are going hungry. Won’t you join us in feeding our homeless and hungry US Veterans today? Donate now to fight Veteran hunger today. Thank you for your kind contribution!

DONATE NOW!

CLICKING HERE WILL OPEN UP A SECURE WINDOW AT THE NETWORK FOR GOOD. THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING OUR VETERANS!

PLEASE VISIT THE FEED OUR VETS WEBPAGE, CLICK ON THE LINKS ABOVE OR CLICK HERE: http://www.feedourvets.org/