Our Colors

 

Our Colors

Our Colors

Our Colors

We Americans, since July 4th, 1776, when 56 delegates from across the 13 Colonies converged on Philadelphia to seal our national fate, live by our colors. It’s the representation of everything we are and strive to be.

We’ve seen it endure through all types of adversity—wars, riots, protests, foreign incursion. Yet we keep striving…and so do our colors.

What makes this country great is not necessarily the decisions we make, but our desire to always be better. This is what separates us from everyone else. We don’t play to be safe. We play big. We play to win, always. It’s that first Betsy Ross Flag, with its 13 Stars, that represents

Our Colors

Our Colors

this great American experiment. It shows, from 13 to 50, that we’re an evolving people who never settle for less. It represents our penchant for adventure and excellence, how we’ll never quit.

The first stitching on our flag is more than a statement—it’s the building block of our national soul.

Pity the Man

 

Pity the Man

Pity the Man

Pity the Man

It’s a basic human fact: Adversity breeds success for those willing to conquer it.
We live in a changing world—especially in the West. Entitlement has crept into our collective mindset. More and more people are expecting results without putting in the work. But a recent growth of self-entitled attitudes aren’t going to change fundamental truths of nature brought on by millions of years of human evolution.
No matter what, to get the results you want, you must suffer. You must fall, fail, and experience setbacks to learn rudimentary truths about life and success within it. You must face and battle Resistance. You must work and endure hard times to get better at your craft—whether it is athletics, art, business, being a Soldier, etc.

Pity the Man

Pity the Man

From that suffering you’ll find yourself. You’ll learn your limits or lack thereof. You’ll learn how to fall and get back up. You’ll learn to adapt to your environment. That’s what separates the Michael Jordans and Bill Gates’ of the world from the ones who will quickly be forgotten about.

As writer Steven Pressfield put it, “It’s better to be in the arena, getting stomped by the bull, than to be up in the stands or out in the parking lot.”

Here I Am – Send Me

Here I Am - Send Me

Here I Am – Send Me

“Here Am I, Send Me”

A warrior reflecting on his blade and the hours he has toiled to master it. He has suffered much for the profession of arms and has the callouses, scars, and stories to prove it. As he remembers those who have not been up to the task, who have not had the strength to serve, he counts himself lucky that he has been bestowed with the gifts of strength, discipline and fortitude. Blessed be the Lord my strength who teaches my hands to fight and my fingers to war.

Years later, the same warrior standing ready. He does not look for conflict, but if his country requires it, he wants to be the first in the fray. He states simply: Here Am I, Send Me”.

Here I Am - Send Me

Here I Am – Send Me