Thank you from TEAM USA to America

The team behind the team? That means you, America. And our athletes want to thank you for your support. Whether you added a stitch during the Raise Our Flag campaign, attended a countdown event or just found yourself swept up in the hundreds of inspiring stories authored by the 759 athletes who represented Team USA at the Olympic and Paralympic Games in London, those athletes want to say …”Thank you, America.” Featuring: Gabby Douglas, Missy Franklin, Lolo Jones, Alex Morgan, Tim Morehouse, Kelsey Campbell, Kerry Walsh, Misty May-Treanor, Seth Kelsey, Elena Pirozhkova, Jordan Burroughs, Allison Schmidt, Brady Ellison, Alise Post, Brooke Crain, Jamie Nieto, Maya Moore

“IT TAKES TRAINING TO MAKE AN ATHLETE, BUT IT TAKES A NATION TO MAKE AN OLYMPIAN ” – Lori “Lolo” Jones

PARALYMPIC GAMES OFFER ANOTHER CHANGE TO SERVE THE USA

When an IED explosion took his eyesight in the line of duty last year, Lt. Bradley Snyder of the U.S. Navy could have lost the ability to serve his country. Instead, he learned to serve in a whole new way at the Paralympic Games this summer.

Thank you, America, for standing by Lt. Snyder and so many Olympic and Paralympic athletes.

From Serving in Afghanistan to Winning Gold!
During a tour in Afghanistan last year, Lt. Snyder stepped on an IED and sustained severe injuries to his face. He’ll never see again.  But five weeks after the injury, he started swimming laps. A former swimmer at the Naval Academy, Lt. Snyder knew if he could get back into the pool it would show everyone he was OK.

Part of a Team Again — Team USA
In a matter of months, Lt. Snyder made it back to qualify in seven events at the Paralympic Games in London. And he has said how humbling it was to hear so many supporters like you cheering him on.

With your support behind him, Bradley brought home two gold medals and a silver, as well as a lifetime of memories…

 

Like being Team USA’s flag bearer in the Closing Ceremony and winning his second gold medal in the 400-meter freestyle on the anniversary of his injury.

A Big “Thank You” from Team USA
The Paralympic Games allowed Lt. Snyder and 19 other service members and veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces to continue serving the country they love.

Reading Of The Names – Vietnam Veteran Memorial 2012


Reading Of The Names – Vietnam Veteran Memorial 2012

From November 7 to November 10, 2012, the “Reading Of The Names” will take place at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC.  I will have the honor and privilege to read 30 names on November 9th.  I will be reading the following names from Panel  37  W :

1. FIAPAI FANUA JR
2. EDDIE D FOSTER
3. FRED GERTZEN
4. MICHAEL E GIBIS
5. RICKY D GIPSON
6. NICHOLAS V GONZALES
7. DANIEL L GREGG
8. VICTOR HALE
9. CHARLES W HALL JR
10. WAYNE D HAMILTON
11. JOHN D HANCOCK
12. JOHN C HARDING JR
13. MARVIN L HARTMAN
14. JOHN F HIGGINS
15. DAVID M JALBERT
16. RICHARD D JAMES
17. JOHN K KOSTER
18. CONNARD D MALLORY
19. LARRY L MARSH
20. LEROY C MARTINSON
21. CARL J MILLER
22. DAVID N MOORE
23. FRANK F MUSICK
24. STEPHEN E NEAS
25. JERRY L OWENS
26. JOSEPH S PIRRUCCELLO JR
27. ROBERT A REX
28. EARNEST L REYNOLDS
29. FELIX D RIDGE
30. LARRY G SANDNES

I have read up about every one of these men.  Every one of them is a hero.  These names represent only 30 out of the 58,282 men and women who “Gave It All” so others could be free.  These are 30 of the bravest men who ever existed.  Some of them were killed so their “Brothers” could live.  Some were killed by “friendly fire”.  Some are still listed as MIA.  These men were men of honor, courage, loyalty, integrity, spirit, respect, dedication, and patriotism.  These men set the standard for others to aspire to obtain.  None of these men died in vain.  They died trying to preserve freedom in a land where there was none.

I salute these men, they are all my Heroes.  I will NEVER forget them.

To the members of firebase116.org, Chapter 116, Leominster, MA:

I would be honored to remember any men or women that you would like.  I can do etchings of a Heroes name, or leave a message, flowers, a prayer or something for them to let them know that you will NEVER forget them.  I’ll be at The Wall for 4 days.  Let me know if there is anything I can do for you.  Email me your requests: [email protected]

Viewpoint: Stand Down Stands Up For Our Veterans

Viewpoint: Stand Down Stands Up For Our Veterans                                                                                  By JAMES SENEY

With his muscular build and short hair, he is perhaps one of the last people anyone would expect to be homeless.

But in the next month, the 22-year-old veteran may lose his apartment and join the ranks of New England’s homeless people.

And he is not alone. One year ago, the former Army private first class was a proud member of Operation Enduring Freedom, completing a one-year deployment in Afghanistan.

Now he wonders if he’ll get a job or, one year from now, where he will live.

Next week in Springfield, the Western Massachusetts Stand Down will be held to help as many of the estimated 3,000 homeless veterans in our region and to prevent veterans believed to be at risk of homelessness from being without a place to live.

The event, held at the Greek Cultural Center in the North End, represents a close partnership with many organizations, including strong leadership from Gumersindo Gomez from the Western Mass Bilingual Veterans Outreach Center, the city of Springfield, the Massachusetts Department of Veterans’ Services, and our area’s municipal veteran services officers.

The 2012 Stand Down will take place Friday, Sept. 28, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. It provides veterans with a centralized, one-stop approach to receiving resources on the spot, bringing together VA programs and services; community health care providers, including health prevention and wellness resources; counseling services; legal aid; the Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles; the Social Security Administration; and many other services, including food, clothing and haircuts.

According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, the current economic downturn and the downsizing of the armed forces are the biggest risk factors for newly demobilized service members, resulting in postwar unemployment, missed rent payments and homelessness. Many, like the 22 year-old former soldier, sleep in their cars, move in for a while with relatives or friends, camp out in the woods, or find a cheap motel room and never come to the attention of state or local authorities. And the new picture of veteran homelessness also includes female veterans with children. Nearly all are unemployed. They want to work but cannot find jobs or at least steady work. Or they have work but cannot find housing they can afford so they end up couch surfing – the practice of temporarily living with a stranger – free of charge.

Most never dreamed they would find themselves in such straits. And their troubles are just starting as fall begins and cold weather will quickly set in. Stand Down, while focused on those veterans at greatest risk of needing services, is also intended for all veterans, including active-duty military members, and their families.

With a tough economy and our nation still in recession, every veteran can benefit from the information and resources shared at Stand Down. Three-and-a-half years ago, an estimated 107,000 veterans were homeless in our nation. The number is now estimated to be less than 60,000 but the VA and our community partners cannot be satisfied until every Veteran who has fought for America has a home in America.

If we are to end the travesty of veteran homelessness, we need a total team approach. Every citizen has a role to play. At a minimum, we’d ask for your help in identifying and referring veterans in need. Every community member can make a difference in reaching out to our veterans. The hardship of homelessness is compounded by the truth that our homeless veterans had once put their lives on the line to serve our country in wars past and present. They deserve the very best support network possible. When we ask our men and women to fight and sacrifice for us in defense of our nation, we make a promise that we will give them the support they need when they come home. The Stand Down offers one way to fulfill that promise. If you know a veteran in need, tell them about Stand Down.


James Seney is the program manager for Community Reintegration Services for the VA Central Western Massachusetts Healthcare System.

Click here for more info concerning upcoming Stand Downs.

11.11.12 – Veterans Day at The Wall

11.11.12 – Veterans Day at The Wall

 
 
From: Jan Scruggs, VVMF
Sent: Wednesday, September 19, 2012 10:09 AM
To: [email protected]
Subject: Veterans Day at The Wall
 
Hello there,

Have you ever been to Washington, D.C. on Veterans Day? It’s an incredible sight to see.

Veterans and families from all over the country congregate at The Wall to remember lost loved ones, hear prominent speakers from all walks of life, and honor all who have served in the United States Armed Forces.

It’s a moving ceremony. This year, I want to personally invite you to be a part of it:

RSVP to our Veterans Day at The Wall as an individual: Open seating is available for individuals who are planning to attend. If you are coming with your family or a small group, make sure each person is individually registered.

Or RSVP to attend Veterans Day at The Wall with a group: We offer ticketed seating to groups of 10 or more who wish to attend the event. Sign up your group and request seating today.

We look forward to seeing you on Sunday, November 11, as we remember, honor, and celebrate the men and women who have given so much in defense of our country.

Veterans Day at The Wall begins at 1:00 pm, and seating will go fast. Make sure you register today.

Thank you,

Jan Scruggs
President and Founder
Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund

P.S. Unable to attend Veterans Day at The Wall? Write a message of thanks to our veterans that we can share at the ceremony. Click Here.

Contact VVMF:

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund is located at:
2600 Virginia Avenue, NW
Suite 104
Washington, D.C. 20037

Telephone: (202) 393-0090
Fax: (202) 393-0029

E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.vvmf.org

We all have special dates when we remember our fallen hero or loved ones. Birthdays, anniversaries or casualty dates are commonly set aside as days of honor and recollection. Every day on our Facebook page, the VVMF remembers a specific fallen hero and shares his/her story with thousands of followers. We want to remember your hero, too. Click the graphic above to Remember Your Hero.

 

 

America’s Prisoner of War/Missing/Killed in Action – WE WILL NEVER FORGET!

Friday, September 21, 2012 is the National POW/MIA Recognition Day. 

Observances of National POW/MIA Recognition Day are held across the country on military installations, ships at sea, state capitols, schools and veterans’ facilities. It is traditionally observed on the third Friday in September each year. This observance is one of six days throughout the year that Congress has mandated the flying of the National League of Families’ POW/MIA flag. The others are Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day and Veterans Day.

The flag is to be flown at major military installations, national cemeteries, all post offices, VA medical facilities, the World War II Memorial, Korean War Veterans Memorial, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the official offices of the secretaries of state, defense and veterans affairs, the director of the selective service system and the White House.

WE WILL NOT FORGET THAT, ALL GAVE SOME AND SOME GAVE ALL!

Sept. 21, 2012 POW/MIA National Recognition Day

Sept. 21, 2012 POW/MIA National Recognition Day

firebase116.org WILL NEVER FORGET the women and men POW/MIA/KIAs.  Our American Flag is flying right above our National League of Families’ POW/MIA flag today and EVERY DAY.