Project New Hope

 

Project New Hope

Project New Hope Inc.

Dear Veterans: We thank you for your service to our nation by offering you and your family a stress-free weekend.  Project New Hope Inc. (Leicester, MA)  exists to provide veteran retreats. Including the whole family (even the kids!) is unique to Project New Hope and fosters family togetherness through a wilderness getaway.

It is our goal to provide veterans (singles, couples, and families) with the education, training, and skills necessary to manage their lives after wartime service, repair of relationships is a primary goal. And of course, we want you to relax, have fun and reconnect with your family and other veterans. Eat plenty of good food, sleep like a baby, and build great memories and have fun in the process!

NO COST TO PARTICIPANTS. That’s right. There is no cost to the families on the retreat.

Project New Hope Inc.

 

Fort Devens Museum plans Armed Forces Day open house on May 19, 2012

DEVENS — The public is invited to the Fort Devens Museum’s Open House on Saturday, May 19, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., when Armed Forces Day will be observed with exhibits, talks and an opportunity to share conversation about the military and local history with others over refreshments.

The museum is located on the third floor at 94 Jackson Road, Devens. Follow the signs and balloons to the parking area. Guest speakers will cover a broad range of subjects and an even wider timeline than the installation’s 95 years of existence.

The event is free and open to the public. For more details, contact the Fort Devens Museum at 978-772-1286 or [email protected].

Navy Announces DDG 116 to be Named Thomas Hudner

Department of Defense Public Affairs (NNS) — Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced May 7 the next Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer (DDG) will be named the USS Thomas Hudner.  Thomas J. Hudner Jr., a naval aviator who retired as a captain, received the Medal of Honor from President Harry S. Truman for displaying uncommon valor during an attack on his wingman, the first African American naval aviator to fly in combat, Ensign Jesse L. Brown.  During the Battle of Chosin Reservoir in the Korean War, anti-aircraft fire hit Brown’s aircraft, damaging a fuel line and causing him to crash.  After it became clear Brown was seriously injured and unable to free himself Hudner proceeded to purposefully crash his own aircraft to join Brown and provide aid.  Hudner injured his own back during his crash landing, but he stayed with Brown until a rescue helicopter arrived.  Hudner and the rescue pilot worked in the sub-zero, snow-laden area in an unsuccessful attempt to free Brown from the smoking wreckage.Hudner is the last living Navy recipient of the Medal of Honor from the Korean War.After receiving recognition for his heroism, Hudner remained on active duty, completing an additional 22 years of naval service during which his accomplishments include flying 27 combat missions in the Korean War and serving as the executive officer aboard the USS Kitty Hawk during the Vietnam War.  “Thomas Hudner exemplifies the core values of honor, courage and commitment the Navy holds dear,” said Mabus.  “Naming the Navy’s next DDG for him will ensure his legacy will be known, honored and emulated by future generations of sailors and Marines who serve and all who come in contact with this ship.”  The Arleigh Burke class destroyer will be able to conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection.  It will be capable of fighting air, surface and subsurface battles simultaneously and will contain a myriad of offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime warfare in keeping with the Navy’s ability to execute the Department of Defense’s defense strategy.For more information about the Arleigh Burke class destroyers please visit: http://www.navy.mil/navydata/fact_display.asp?cid=4200&tid=900&ct=4.> For more information regarding Capt. Thomas J. Hudner, Jr. please visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_J._Hudner,_Jr.

For more information regarding Ensign Jesse L. Brown please visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesse_L._Brown

The Veterans Opportunity to Work (VOW) to Hire Heroes Act of 2011

Are you or do you know an unemployed Veteran age 35-60?

If so, there is a new Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Department of Labor’s (DOL) education benefit program that helps train Veterans in high demand occupations.

As a VetSuccess.gov user we would like to share information about our new programs and benefits that are underway due to the enactment of a new law. In an effort to reduce Veteran unemployment, the President signed into law the VOW to Hire Heroes Act of 2011 last November.  Included in this new law is the Veterans Retraining Assistance Program (VRAP) for unemployed Veterans, which VA begins accepting applications May 15, 2012.

VRAP will provide 99,000 eligible Veterans with up to one year of additional Montgomery GI Bill benefits in order to help you earn training and certifications in high-demand job. In order to receive these benefits, you must attend a VA approved program of education offered by a community college or technical school.

The requirements to be eligible for the VRAP program are:

  • You must be unemployed the day you apply
  • You must be least 35 but no more than 60 years old
  • You must have an other than dishonorable discharge
  • You must not be eligible for any other VA education benefit program (e.g., the Post 9/11 GI Bill, Montgomery GI Bill, Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment)
  • You must not in receipt of VA compensation due to Individual Unemployability (IU)
  • You cannot be enrolled in a federal or state job training program
  • You must be enrolled in a VA approved program of education offered by a community college or technical school

You can begin applying May 15, 2012, but cannot start any education or training until June 1, 2012 and you must apply to VA by March 31, 2014.

I cannot encourage you enough to take advantage of this unique opportunity if you are eligible, and if you are not, but know a fellow Veteran, who may be eligible, please pass this information along to them.

Also under this new law,  if you are a Veteran with a service-connected disability and have previously completed a VA vocational rehabilitation program and have used the initial 26 weeks of unemployment benefits you may qualify for an additional 12 months of VA vocational rehabilitation benefits.  To be eligible you must:

  • Have previously completed a VA Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment program and been considered “rehabilitated” by VA.
  • Apply within six months of using up your initial 26 weeks of unemployment benefits. You may still qualify for extended or emergency unemployment benefits.

To apply or learn more information about VRAP or Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment benefits, including on how to apply please visit:

www.benefits.va.gov/VOW

Your best bet…Hire a Vet!

Resources:

National League of POW/MIA Families

WE WILL NEVER FORGET!

The National League of Families of American Prisoners and Missing in Southeast Asia was incorporated in the District of Columbia on May 28, 1970. Voting membership is comprised of wives, children, parents, siblings and other close relatives of Americans who were or are listed as Prisoners of War (POW), Missing in Action (MIA), Killed in Action/Body not Recovered (KIA/BNR) and returned American Vietnam War POWs. Associate membership is comprised of POW/MIA and KIA/BNR relatives who do not meet voting membership requirements, veterans and other concerned citizens.  The League’s sole purpose is to obtain the release of all prisoners, the fullest possible accounting for the missing and repatriation of all recoverable remains of those who died serving our nation during the Vietnam War.

The League originated on the west coast in the late 1960s. Believing that the US Government’s policy of keeping a low profile on the POW/MIA issue while urging family members to refrain from publicly discussing the problem was unjustified, Bring Them Home or Send Us Backthe wife of a ranking POW initiated a loosely organized movement that evolved into the National League of POW/MIA Families. In October 1968, the first POW/MIA story was published. As a result of that publicity, the families began communicating with each other, and the group grew in strength from 50 to 100, to 300, and kept growing. Small POW/MIA family groups flooded the North Vietnamese delegation in Paris with telegraphic inquiries regarding the prisoners and missing, the first major activity in which hundreds of families participated.

Eventually, the necessity for formal incorporation was recognized. In May 1970, a special adhoc meeting of the families was held at Constitution Hall in Washington, DC, at which time the League’s charter and by-laws were adopted. Elected by the voting membership, now numbering approximately 1,000, a seven-member Board of Directors meets regularly to determine League policy and direction. Board Members, Regional Coordinators, responsible for activities in multi-state areas, and State Coordinators represent the League in most states.

Freedom has a flavor the protected shall never know.

For additional information on League policies, positions and activities, check the web site: www.pow-miafamilies.org.

Did you know…

1,666 Americans are now listed by DoD as missing and unaccounted for from the Vietnam War: Vietnam – 1,284 (VN-471 VS-813); Laos – 318; Cambodia – 57; Peoples Republic of China territorial waters – 7.  (These numbers occasionally fluctuate due to investigations resulting in changed locations of loss.)  The League seeks the return of all US prisoners, the fullest possible accounting for those still missing and repatriation of all recoverable remains.  The League’s highest priority is accounting for Americans last known alive. Official intelligence indicates that Americans known to be in captivity in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia were not returned at the end of the war.  In the absence of evidence to the contrary, it must be assumed that these Americans may still be alive.  As policy, the US Government does not rule out the possibility that Americans could still be held.

Related…Home At Last

Army Capt. Charles R. Barnes, 27, of Philadelphia, Pa., was buried yesterday, May 2, in Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, D.C. On March 16, 1969, Welcome Home Brother.Barnes and four other service members departed Qui Nhon Airfields bound for Da Nang and Phu Bai, in a U-21A Ute aircraft.  As they approached Da Nang, they encountered low clouds and poor visibility. Communications  with the aircraft were lost, and they did not land as scheduled. Immediate search efforts were limited due to hazardous weather conditions, and all five men were listed as missing in action.

Rest in Peace our Brother.  We will NEVER forget you and the price you paid.